Chicken.Kiev - main page
 
Internet-magazineEventsReviewsDying youngAdvice and etiquetteWorld cuisineVarious
Rambler's Top100    «Kyiv Restaurants»
Internet-magazine Events Reviews Dying young Advice and etiquette World cuisine Various

    Chicken.Kiev recommends
    Restaurant's rating
    Table reservations
    Visitors book
    Discounts
    A Connoisseur Club
    Contact details
 
   Kyiv restaurants pages:

 
   Restaurant search:

  Location:
 

  Cuisine:
 

  Price per person:
 

  Cards accepted:
 

  online table reservation
  online menu
  Chicken.Kiev discounts

   The Magnificent Seven

  1.
  2.
  3. O`Panas
  4.
  5.
  6.
  7.

   Chicken.Kiev recommend!
Pizzeria «Chelentano»
Location: Pechersk
Cuisine: Italian
Price: from $10 to $20 per person
 
Menu...
Chicken.Kiev recommend!
 
 
Chicken.Kiev >> «Chicken.Kiev» internet-magazine >> World cuisine

Ukrainian cuisine

Budmo, hey! (Let's be!)

"Evenings in the hamlet near Dykanka"

The first thing which comes to my mind... No, that's not what I should say. The first picture which my imagination paints when I hear the words "Ukrainian cuisine" is an episode from the movie of Hohol's "Evenings in the hamlet near Dykanka", where varenyky, having rolled around by themselves in sour cream, jump into Patsiuk(The Rat)'s mouth. What a great moment! What a great delicacy! And what a great way to eat it! It is certainly a pity that nobody has yet invented a "remote control for the mouth and the plate", and the above method of delivering food into the mouth is just the devil's trick or Hohol's project that is impossible to implement. But then, the amount of halushky (by the way, in a big, big bowl) is just right for our healthy and inspired Ukrainian appetite! Never mind how other people eat, but we, not so rich people, or one can even say people very far from being rich, are used to eating in grand style. It is not without reason that our phrase, "Love comes and goes, but you will always want to eat!", simply does not translate well into other languages - probably foreigners simply just do not have such words.

So, what am I talking about? Oh yeah, about the unmatched Ukrainian cuisine!

"There's no fish better than tench,

and no meat better than pork."

Among all the dishes of Ukrainian cuisine, for example, that of the very beginning of the XX century, one can single out several subcategories, which were the most popular among native Ukrainian people: those made from grains, beans, vegetables, and fruits. Note than in the old days, dishes made from meat were considered food for festive days only, and among all the existing kinds of meat, the undisputable preference was given to pork and certainly (could there be any doubting it?) salo - oh, our Ukrainian salo!

Today, our grandmothers have a reserve of over 1000 recipes for meat dishes, of which this retrograde, ungrateful generation has never even heard "Sichenyky", "Tovchenyky", "Kruchenyky", "Dushenyna", "Porebryna", "Lyzen", "Bigos", "Gliagy", "Polotky", "Kryzhni", "Smoked Sausage" and "Cossacks' Rissoles" Stop! I think there's enough disappointments for now! I'll give you a simple recipe however.

"Larded liver"

Well, lard the liver with salo, and cut it into several parts. Then heat sunflower oil with a spoonful of butter in a deep frying pan, lay the liver into the pan with thin circles of fresh-cut onion and pepper, and add 1/2 spoonful of butter. Braise until fully cooked and add salt before serving!

"It's so weak and poor, this table without meat, whatever masterpiece dish you put on it!" Don't you agree with what this plain, unprepossessing modern verse says?

I think you do!

"'To 'horseradish' with all of us!"

But don't jump to conclusions! I only wanted to say that despite the Far East's claims to be the home of horseradish, it has its home here, in Ukraine2. Since nobody knows when, horseradish grows in Ukraine, as both a "wild mysterious flower", and a "domesticated, kitchengarden plant", rich in 'C' vitamin and irreplaceable when making relishes for meat and fish.

rain, oh rain,

give me please some borsch again...

The fact is that throughout all of the myriad of Ukrainian regions, borsch is cooked differently, and has different names "Volyn Borsch", "Chernihiv Borsch", "Kuban Borsch", "Hetman's Borsch", "Kyiv Borsch" etc, etc. But what's the difference? you ask. Obviously, in the way it's made. For example, "Hetman's Borsch" absolutely will not qualify for that name, if separately boiled beans are not added and some fresh (or canned) egg plants. True "Kyiv Borsch" genearally consists of "three basic pillars" - chicken, beef, and pork, in other words is based on chicken and beef bouillon, and seasoned with salo. "Kuban Borsch" differs from its "relatives" in that, it contains, as well as beetroot, cabbage, onion and other essential ingredients, some small dried mushrooms are added as well as cloves and beetroot "kvass" for a sour taste.

I make "Krachkovski Borsch", i.e. the one from the recipe by Natalia Krachkovska. For those who have never tasted it, I really recommend it (by the way, there's a little joke about it. After his wedding night Lieutenant Rzhevski came out to greet the town. And when asked: "How did it go?" he proudly uttered with a high head, "I really recommend it, my friends!")

And now for the recipe. Bouillon made from pork ribs, with a traditional bouquet of spices added (parsley, dill, bay leaves and non-ground black pepper), chunks of onion, carrots and beetroot (so that after cooking, they could be easily fished back out again). Simultaneously, a fry-up is made. But keep watching it carefully! First, fry the onion, and then add grated carrot and beetroot, finely chopped fresh tomatoes and a squirt of lemmon juice (to preserve the color). Salt to taste and wait

When the bouillon is ready, add a few potatoes, and a few minutes later finely chopped cabbage, and just before it is ready, add the fry-up and garlic!

An exquisite vegetarian recipe

from Radmila Schioholeva,

or simply Gelia

from simply "SV-Show"

The most important rule for cooking borsch is to have no rules! Besides, borsch is something that simply cannot taste bad! The only thing I can't ignore when making borsch is following the tenets of beauty of this dish since  I love Moulinex's aethetic concept!

The rest is elementary: the borsch bouillon is made of beans, potatoes, and a whole onion (for the taste). Lightly fry in butter the beetroot and carrots after chopping them in the food processor, then separately fry the onion with Chumak sauce. Before adding all that into the borsch, put cabbage (lots of cabbage) into it, and add three teaspoons of sugar, a tablespoon of salt and ground sweet-scented pepper. Finally, and one could say, the most important touch: finely chopped potherbs and seven bulbs of garlic!

And remember, there should be a lot of vegetables!

"No drink in the morning

means a lost day!"

One day, when interviewing the chef of one of Kyiv's restaurants, who doesn't speak any Russian at all, I asked the question, "What is the difference between the tastes of Ukrainians and French people?" And what to you think he answered? "Ukrainians drink a lot!", he said smiling modestly, and asked me not to mention that in my article.

But we know that! That's why we are considered the strongest and healthiest nation in the world! Not so long ago, Chernobyl was tested on us. Thank God we drink!

So, it is not without good reason that when you just hear the list of strong drinks made by our forefathers, you feel giddy! Look, for example: what is "usaka"? It's strong vodka, with some ginger, cardamom and a massive amount of red spicy pepper, and not paprika! Poor usaka: to increase its strength before drinking, people would put it in the oven! And "Varenukha"! - Vodka, made from dried apples, pears, plums and cherries, with the addition of linden-blossom, ginger, cloves, and cinnamon, and then infused in an oven for a whole 12 hours in a covered and carefully sealed pot not a cold oven, of course, but after the coals have burnt down. These drinks also include "Mokrukha", and "Bodianivka", and "Zapikanka ('Jaw-Burning Drink')", about which Ivan Kotliarevskyi himself said in his "Aeneid" poem, when talking about some sides of the life of the inhabitants of paradise:

"...Or they would drink some vodka,

Not the one infused with tobacco, or that foamy one,

The third-grade product,

Oh no, theirs was infused with bodian herb,

Burning the jaws,

And with aniseed, and in addition to tormentil3,

It had both pepper and saffron...

However, even for "Titiunkova" (tobacco vodka), or that magnificent "Tertukha" made for unsurpassed women, with wild strawberries specially pounded with sugar, it is probably also impossible to consider them as second-grade drinks.

And "Spotykach (Stumbling Vodka) is a completely different story! The smells of 30 types of this trunok4 will bring anybody and everybody to the tasting room.

But that's not all! I've not told you about "Medovuhi", "Bragi", "Cossack's beer", "Starosvitske (Old-World) wine", about "Rodzianka" and about "Motrona's kvass"! I'm afraid there's just not enough space here! And it's more pleasant not only to hear about, but also to taste simultaneously! The opportunity, by the way, exists!

____________

1  For more details see: Zynoviya Klynovetska. Dishes and drinks in Ukraine,

Kyiv Lviv, 1913. There also exists a phototype edition published in 1991 (Chas Publishing House) with detailed comment by Cand. Sc. (History) Lidiya Artiukh (Maksym Rylski Institute for Art, Folklore, and Ethnography Studies of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine).

2  To be honest, in botanical science, there is only one opinion on that matter: horseradish has no home, or more exactly, its home is not known. Although Brazil, Venezuela and Paraguay insist on their right to be regarded as the home of horseradish. But we don't care "To hell (or 'to horseradish', as we say in Ukrainian and Russian!) with them and with us!"

3 Tormentil is what is called Potentilla erecta in Latin (Potentilla silvestris and Tormentilla erecta being its synonyms).

4 "Trunok" in Ukrainian means an exquisite alcoholic drink; it is interesting to compare that Ukrainian word with the English "drink".

(Editor's comment)



 
 
   Chicken.Kiev maillist
  News on Kyiv's
  restaurant life  

UKRAINIAN CUISINE

Budmo, hey! (Let's be!) The first thing which comes to my mind... No, that's not what I should say. The first picture which my imagination paints when I hear the words "the Ukrainian cuisine" is an episode from the movie of Hohol's "Evenings in the hamlet near Dykanka", where varenyky, having rolled around by themselves in sour cream, jump into Patsiuk(The Rat)'s mouth. What a great moment! What a great delicacy! And what a great way to eat it! It is certainly a pity that nobody has yet invented a "remote control for the mouth and the plate", and the above method of delivering food into the mouth is just the devil's trick or Hohol's project that is impossible to implement. But then, the amount of halushky (by the way, in a big, big bowl) is just right for our healthy and inspired Ukrainian appetite! Never mind how other people eat, but we, not so rich people, or one can even say people very far from being rich, are used to eating in grand style. It is not without reason that our phrase, "Love comes and goes, but you will always want to eat!", simply does not translate well into other languages - probably foreigners simply just do not have such words. So, what am I talking about? Oh yeah, about the unmatched Ukrainian cuisine! "There's no fish better than tench, and no meat better than pork." Among all the dishes of Ukrainian cuisine, for example, that of the very beginning of the XX century, one can single out several subcategories, which were the most popular among native Ukrainian people: those made from grains, beans, vegetables, and fruits. Note than in the old days, dishes made from meat were considered food for festive days only, and among all the existing kinds of meat, the undisputable preference was given to pork and certainly (could there be any doubting it?) salo - oh, our Ukrainian salo!


  © 2000-2017 Chicken.Kiev